Lighting 101 Get the facts

Types of Lighting

Incandescent lighting

In houses all around the world, the these bulbs have been the most popular type of light source since the light bulb’s invention. It even sparked the creation of the electricity grid as the first product that would require electricity in the home. It has taken a bit of a bashing in recent years with the advent of energy saving alternatives. However, there are still many who prefer the warm yellow glow of an incandescent bulb compared to the harsh cool whites of now popular and affordable compact fluorescent (CFL) bulbs. A 75W bulb can produce ~1180 lumens. 

CFL lighting

In recent years, compact fluorescent (CFL) light bulbs have been popping up around the globe. A CFL is a fluorescent bulb which has been coiled around itself to make the fluorescent design more compact. Due to the use of phosphorous, most CFLs emit a cold white light, skewing towards the blue part of the light spectrum. The appearance of the bulbs twisted design and the cold white tones of light produced make them less desirable for people who prefer the warmer tones of traditional incandescent lighting. Recently there have been some advancements in this, and there are CFLs now on the market which use a modified phosphorous powder to create a warmer color closer to traditional incandescent bulbs. A typical 20W CFL can produce ~1200 lumens, making it a great 75W bulb replacement.

Halogen lighting

Halogen bulbs are also a great alternative to incandescent lighting. A halogen bulb is a light source similar to an incandescent bulb,. The most welcome feature of newer halogen bulbs, is bright white light without the blue tones of a fluorescent bulb, but whiter than the yellow tones of a traditional incandescent light bulb. The brightness of a halogen bulb is perfect for reading, studying, or working because it can illuminate a localized area effectively, producing better illumination compared to compact fluorescent lights. The bright white light which halogen bulbs produce is the result of a much higher heat than commonly seen with standard incandescent lights. Halogen lights are therefore exceptionally hot. For halogen, roughly 52W will produce ~1060 lumens. More efficient than traditional sources, but not as efficient as CFL.